Buyer Picks

The 8 Best Organic Wines, According to Buyers

Sommeliers, retail buyers, and wine directors share their favorite organic, biodynamic, and sustainable wines

A block collage of the organic wine selection
Organic wines have become increasingly popular with consumers. Photo courtesy of SevenFifty Daily Staff.

The shelves of local retailers are evidence enough that consumers in the U.S. are increasingly interested in organic, biodynamic, and other sustainable wines. But the data backs it up, too: The number of drinkers who said they would pay more for a sustainable wine rose from 21 percent in 2021 to 30 percent in 2022, according to IWSR Drinks Market Analysis. On top of that, 46 percent of drinkers said they would always choose a sustainable wine if given the choice.

For many wine professionals this is welcome news, especially for the sommeliers and retailers who champion organic producers—or those practicing organic—on their lists and shelves already. It offers a greater opportunity to introduce their clientele to the increasing number of mindfully farmed wines that don’t just taste good but work towards bettering the environment.

SevenFifty Daily spoke with buyers around the country about the organic wines they are excited to recommend right now.

From left to right: Kellie Holmes, the wine and events director of Herd Provisions; Nibiru ‘Tradition’ NV. Photos courtesy of Herd Provisions.

Nibiru ‘Tradition’ NV, Kamptal, Austria; $59

Selected by Kellie Holmes, wine and events director, Herd Provisions, Charleston, South Carolina

Humanely-raised beef from Herd Provisions’ own farm is the centerpiece at this restaurant, butcher shop, and grocery store, and Kellie Holmes’ wine list falls in line with the sustainably sourced ethos of the menu. She focuses on small-production winemakers who practice low-intervention winemaking. Off the floor, Holmes also champions the work of mindful producers in her role as co-chair of the Slow Food Charleston chapter.

Currently, she’s excited about this red cuvée from Demeter-certified Nibiru in Kamptal, Austria. This “easy red wine is crunchy and fresh,” she says with “lots of dark berry fruit, and an undercurrent of potting soil,” and it’s best served chilled. The fruit—a blend of Merlot and Zweigelt—is sourced from organic and biodynamic vineyards surrounded by forests in the northernmost part of the region. “The combination of loess [silt, sand, and clay] topsoil over hard rock, and the northernmost exposure inform this wine’s fresh and mineral-driven core,” she says.

Left to right: Selected by Nathan Gordon, the buyer and general manager of The Vineyard Wine Shop; Rogue Vine ‘Grand Itata’ Tinto. Photos courtesy of The Vineyard Wine Shop.
Left to right: Nathan Gordon, the buyer and general manager of The Vineyard Wine Shop; Rogue Vine ‘Grand Itata’ Tinto. Photos courtesy of The Vineyard Wine Shop.

Rogue Vine ‘Grand Itata’ Tinto 2021, Itata Valley, Chile; $19

Selected by Nathan Gordon, buyer and general manager, The Vineyard Wine Shop, Denver

In business since 1971, The Vineyard Wine Shop has focused on fine wine since its inception. But buyer and general manager Nathan Gordon is adamant that fine wine can be found at any price point. One such example is this Cinsault-dominant blend from Rogue Vine, which Gordon describes as “disarmingly delicious, juicy, and fresh with vibrant fruit and just the right rasp of País tannin to keep things solid and structured.” He adds, “It’s a great-value chillable red that’s versatile at the table and also delicious as an aperitif.”

The fruit comes from an organically farmed, single vineyard planted in 1960. Winemakers Leonardo Erazo and Justin Decker practice low-intervention winemaking using minimal water. They were severely hit by Chile’s wildfires in February 2023, losing nearly 90 percent of their vines. “Viticultural treasures like this are increasingly endangered in Chile due to climate change and questionable forestry management, historically speaking, on the part of the state,” says Gordon.

From left to right: Ashley Hausman, MW and the owner of So What Wine; Lady of the Sunshine ‘Chene Vineyard’ Pinot Noir. Photos courtesy of Ashley Hausman.
From left to right: Ashley Hausman, MW and the owner of So What Wine; Lady of the Sunshine ‘Chene Vineyard’ Pinot Noir. Photos courtesy of Ashley Hausman.

Lady of the Sunshine ‘Chene Vineyard’ Pinot Noir 2022, Edna Valley, California; $46

Selected by Ashley Hausman, MW, owner, So What Wine, Stillwater, Minnesota

At So What Wine, owner Ashley Hausman, MW, aims to “shed light in my community on the many special bottles and people that have shaped my relationship with wine,” she says. One of those is winemaker Gina Giuni and her Lady of the Sunshine wines. “[She] represents just about everything I can ever hope to offer my customers,” says Hausman. “Humility, hard work, and a commitment to the land epitomize this grape grower-winemaker—a true vigneron.”

A second-generation grower, Giuni focuses on biodynamic and regenerative farming methods and practices a natural, minimalist style in the cellar. “[Giuni] goes further with lightweight glass, omits capsules, and natural cork,” says Hausman. “Her heart is in the details with family artwork on corks and labels of her own design. Everything about her wines feels crafted, intentional, and thoughtful.”

From left to right: Michelle DeWyngaert, the general manager of The Town Cellar; La Garagista ‘In a Dark Country Sky’. Photo credit: Samantha Smith.
From left to right: Michelle DeWyngaert, the general manager of The Town Cellar; La Garagista ‘In a Dark Country Sky’. Photo credit: Samantha Smith.

La Garagista ‘In a Dark Country Sky’ 2022, Vermont; $40

Selected by Michelle DeWyngaert, general manager, The Town Cellar, Darien, Connecticut

Michelle DeWyngaert felt destined to go into wine—their last name translates to “of the vineyard.” At The Town Cellar, DeWyngaert focuses on smaller, family-owned producers, the majority of which follow organic or biodynamic practices. They believe wine “can generate thoughtful and meaningful conversations” about a wide variety of topics and they encourage this discourse through interactive experiences, such as weekly Friday tastings or monthly wine classes.

DeWyngaert says this La Garagista wine encompasses everything they want to champion at the shop. “Winemaker Deirdre Heekin is doing the most ecological farming possible, which includes using Northeast climate-hearty hybrids, with an incredible team—mostly women—that she treats fairly and with respect,” they say. 

In a Dark Country Sky is 100 percent Marquette, and DeWyngaert describes it as a “bright, purple-fruited, lighter red similar to a Gamay, with just a tiny bit of a spritz, that once decanted, blossoms and has this wonderful umami quality.”

From left to right: Alisha Blackwell-Calvert, the beverage director of Madrina; Lunaria ‘Civitas’ Pecorino. Photo credit: Ed Aller.
From left to right: Alisha Blackwell-Calvert, the beverage director of Madrina; Lunaria ‘Civitas’ Pecorino. Photo credit: Ed Aller.

Lunaria ‘Civitas’ Pecorino 2022, Terre di Chieti, Abruzzo, Italy; $48

Selected by Alisha Blackwell-Calvert, beverage director, Madrina, Webster Groves, Missouri

Alisha Blackwell-Calvert’s career in wine has garnered her numerous accolades, most recently as a 2023 Iconoclast Wine Honoree at the James Beard House. In her role at Italian-American restaurant Madrina, she strives to showcase the wealth of indigenous white Italian varieties. This Lunaria Pecorino, offered both by the glass and bottle, “delivers satisfaction on all accounts, with fresh citrus pith, savory lemon verbena, green almond, and ripened white peach,” she says. “The zesty acidity makes it a reliable accompaniment to all of the seafood offerings on the menu, too.”

Beyond its versatility, Blackwell-Calvert is a fan of the estate’s commitment to sustainability. Lunaria is produced by Cantina Orsogna, a progressive cooperative of growers in Abruzzo, and the label, like others under the company umbrella, focuses on organic and biodynamic farming practices. “Orsogna emphasizes utilizing growers that commit to respecting nature and giving back to the community,” she says. “The Pecorino grapes for the Civitas bottling are Demeter certified and handled with minimal intervention.”

From left to right: Christina Stanley, the wine director of The Slanted Door; Dominique Cornin Pouilly-Fuissé ‘Les Chevrières’. Photo credit: Jonathan Madson.
From left to right: Christina Stanley, the wine director of The Slanted Door; Dominique Cornin Pouilly-Fuissé ‘Les Chevrières’. Photo credit: Jonathan Madson.

Dominique Cornin Pouilly-Fuissé ‘Les Chevrières’ 2020, Pouilly-Fuissé, France; $100

Selected by Christina Stanley, wine director, The Slanted Door, Napa, California

Napa native and advanced sommelier Christina Stanley may have intimate knowledge of her hometown’s wine scene, but in building the wine list for The Slanted Door’s new Napa location, she leaned into her interest in “uncharted” terroir from around the world.

“In 2020, 22 premier cru vineyards of Pouilly-Fuissé were approved, including Les Chevrières,” she says. She loves highlighting this part of history by offering a premier cru vineyard “before it was labeled as such.”

This wine, which Stanley describes as “bright and aromatic, with notes of dried chamomile and jasmine, and expressing its limestone-drenched terroir,” also highlights Stanley’s passion for winemakers who farm mindfully. The estate, certified organic since 2003 and practicing biodynamic, is now under the direction of Romain Cornin, who took over from his father, Dominique. Spontaneous fermentation and no fining or filtering are all hallmark practices in the cellar.

From left to right: Tira Johnson, the wine director of Ilis; Les Vignes de Paradis ‘Un P’tit Coin de Paradis’. Phone courtesy of Tira Johnson.
From left to right: Tira Johnson, the wine director of Ilis; Les Vignes de Paradis ‘Un P’tit Coin de Paradis’. Photos courtesy of Tira Johnson.

Les Vignes de Paradis ‘Un P’tit Coin de Paradis’ 2020, Savoie, France; $115

Selected by Tira Johnson, wine director, Ilis, Brooklyn, New York

Ilis from Noma cofounder Mads Refslund, opened to much excitement in the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn at the end of last year. Seasonality dictates the ingredients, and with such a diverse menu, Tira Johnson is always looking for new wines with which to surprise customers that also can adapt to the ever-changing menu. One selection offered by the glass since day one is this Chasselas from Les Vignes de Paradis in Savoie, France. 

The winemaker Dominique Lucas comes from a négociant family in Burgundy but found himself in Savoie when he was ready to branch out on his own. His 18.5-acre estate is certified organic and farmed biodynamically. “It drinks like fresh mountain air,” Johnson says. “It’s very light, fresh, and displays some floral undertones.”

From left to right: Nancy Sabatini, the wine director of Mainstreet Wines and Spirits; Château de Campuget ‘1753’ Viognier. Photos courtesy of Nancy Sabatini.
From left to right: Nancy Sabatini, the wine director of Mainstreet Wines and Spirits; Château de Campuget ‘1753’ Viognier. Photos courtesy of Nancy Sabatini.

Château de Campuget ‘1753’ Viognier 2021, Costières de Nîmes, Rhône Valley, France; $23.99

Selected by Nancy Sabatini, wine director, Mainstreet Wines and Spirits, Countryside, Illinois

As the wine director for Mainstreet Wine and Spirits, an almost four-decade-old independent wine shop outside of Chicago, Nancy Sabatini is always on the hunt for affordable organic wines to introduce to her clientele. She travels extensively to further her wine knowledge while also uncovering interesting wines that will grab customers’ attention. For this Viognier, her quest took her to the Rhône Valley. Established in 1942 in a château built in 1753 near Nîmes, Château de Campuget is now run by Franck-Lin Dalle, the estate’s third-generation vigneron. In 2019, the winery was certified Haute Valeur Environnementale.  

“I love this aromatic Viognier, with its classical notes of honeysuckle, ginger, and nectarine,” says Sabatini. “It has a balanced mouthfeel, and is bursting with a crisp, long, elegant finish that keeps you coming back for more.”

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Shana Clarke is a wine, sake, and travel writer, and the author of 150 Vineyards You Need To Visit Before You Die. Her work has appeared in Saveur, Fortune, NPR, Wine Enthusiast, and Hemispheres. She was shortlisted for the Louis Roederer 2020 International Wine Writers’ Awards and ranked one of the “Top 20 U.S. Wine Writers That Wineries Can Work With” by Beverage Trade Network in 2021. She holds a Level 3 Advanced Certificate from Wine & Spirit Education Trust and is a Certified Sake Sommelier. She will always say yes to a glass of Champagne. Learn more at www.shanaspeakswine.com and follow her @shanaspeakswine.

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